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Storm causes power outages and property damage throughout the Midwest

Jun 14

A storm system that swept through the Midwest on Tuesday caused widespread damage, including power outages and property damage.

In Illinois, the storm caused damage to homes, businesses and vehicles. Wind gusts of up to 60 mph were reported in some areas. The storm also caused power outages for more than 200,000 customers.

In Indiana, the storm downed trees and power lines, causing power outages for more than 30,000 customers. The storm also caused minor property damage in some areas.

In Michigan, wind gusts of up to 60 mph were reported in some areas. The storm caused power outages for more than 100,000 customers. The storm also downed trees and power lines, causing property damage.

Severe Weather Results in Billions of Dollars of Insurance Claims Annually

The storm system that swept through the Midwest on Monday caused widespread damage, from flooded basements, destroyed roofs and out structures and broken windows. According to the Insurance Information Institute (III), severe weather in the U.S. results in billions of dollars of insurance claims each year.

In 2021, there were 14 weather and climate disaster events with losses exceeding $1 billion each across the United States. These disasters included hurricanes Michael and Florence, tropical storm Gordon, western wildfires, and winter storms Riley and Quinn. Together, these events resulted in over $91 billion in insured losses, making 2021 the fourth-worst year on record for billion-dollar weather and climate disasters since 1950.

Over the past decade (2009-2018), the U.S. has experienced a historic number of billion-dollar weather and climate disasters – an average of six per year. This is nearly double the annual average of 3.2 events per year from 1980-2018. The increased frequency and severity of billion-dollar weather and climate disasters are largely driven by rising temperatures resulting from human-caused climate change.

As temperatures rise, so does the potential for more frequent and intense severe weather events, like the storm system that swept through the Midwest on Tuesday. With climate change playing an increasingly significant role in severe weather events, it's important for everyone to be prepared for the possibility of a natural disaster – whether it's a hurricane, tornado, wildfire, winter storm, or flooding.

There are a few steps you can take to be prepared for severe weather:

- Stay informed about the latest weather conditions and forecasts. The National Weather Service offers a variety of ways to stay up-to-date on the latest weather conditions, including text alerts, email alerts, and mobile apps.

- Have an emergency plan in place. Know what you would do if you had to evacuate your home or business. Make sure everyone in your family or office knows the plan.

- Be sure you have adequate insurance coverage. Review your policy with your agent or company to make sure you're properly covered in case of storm damage, wind damage, or flooding. Consider purchasing flood insurance if you live in an area that's prone to flooding.

- Be prepared to shelter in place. If you can't evacuate, make sure you have a plan for where you would shelter and what supplies you would need. A storm shelter or safe room can provide protection from high winds and flying debris.

Taking these steps can help minimize the impact of severe weather on your home, business, and family. For more information on how to prepare for severe weather, visit the National Weather Service's website.